Young Adult Lit/Crit

April 8, 2008

Beating of Teen Girl Over “Trash Talk”

Filed under: from your prof — sunyprof @ 7:06 am

Have all of you seen this story? Incredibly relevant to the reading we are doing this week. KES

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7 Comments »

  1. This story made me ill, Karen. And it DOES fit in with our readings for this week.

    One thing that really strikes me is the lack of remorse that these teens seemed to show. How could this be?

    I am still stunned. I can hardly speak. But I’ll try.

    Should we take the blame for this? Yes, a lot of us aren’t teaching, or haven’t been teaching for long: it’s not “our fault” that these kids were brought up to think it’s okay to hurt one another. That’s true. But,

    We are being passed the torch.

    How do we allow our own feelings of anger and rage to appear and then be controlled so that students are given an amount of situational modeling? Is it okay to show students that we, too, struggle with our emotions? Is it okay to be vulnerable to student disection, sensitive or angry, filled with warring possibilities between what we feel and what we should be feeling?

    Do schools want their teachers to appear perfect? To not be phased by anything?

    When we enter the classroom, are we to stand before a room filled with hormones and pretend we haven’t any? Are we to feign calm in the face of calamity? Is that what being a role model means?

    Somewhere, someone or someones failed these people (these violent teens) and did not force them to hold themselves accountable for their actions. How do we take a classroom, and hold it accountable?

    Joyce

    Comment by Joyce — April 8, 2008 @ 11:19 am

  2. I saw a clip on CNN of this horrific incident, and the announcer couldn’t have been more accurate when he described it as “animalistic” and all to get 15 minutes of fame…on YOUTUBE?!?!

    Joyce: I am thinking about your comment on how society has brought teens up believing violence to be ok, and you couldn’t have said it better. If we look around, our society glamorizes violence on television, in music, etc. Further, our own government has not do subtly revealed their views–that violence can/does solve problems. Yet despite all this, I like to think that somewhere, these kids knew that their actions were cruel and uncalled for. And I hope they are held accountable. Clearly, if there was character education at this school, it failed miserably.

    -Mandy

    Comment by mandygrl101 — April 8, 2008 @ 5:54 pm

  3. Sickening. This reminds me of the incident several years back when a group of girls hazed new teammates on their soccer? lacrosse? softball? team… video footage was taken and then broadcast on the news. It’s mind-boggling and disgusting how vicious teenagers CAN be, especially the females.

    ~Jessica

    Comment by jexter1 — April 8, 2008 @ 11:06 pm

  4. Horrific. Did you see the list of “Top Stories” towards the bottom of the page? Five out of ten of them relate to our students:

    Today’s Top Stories

    • Cheerleader, Other Girls Beat Up Teen Girl , Tape the Crime
    • Woman Whose Hands, Feet Were Found at Two Homes Identified
    • Police: Prescription Drug Deliveries Stolen By FedEx driver
    • Soldier Returns Home to Mold and Mildew
    • Man Accused of Strangling Mother to Death
    • Mom Says Teen Accused of Beating Girl on Tape is “A Good Girl”
    • Three Teens Injured in Crash of I-385
    • Student Attacked by Classmates Because of Anti-Immigration Sign
    • Bride, Groom Arrested on Wedding Night
    • Teacher Involved in Sex Scandal Released from House Arrest

    Scary.

    I think the scariest part is the detachment the attackers apparently feel. Where does that come from? Where are their parents, teachers, role models?

    -Sarah

    Comment by sostrom — April 9, 2008 @ 8:15 am

  5. God. I was just looking for more information on this story and came across this page of comments. Try to ignore the grammar and spelling. Then see just how pervasive hate is. Comments about the girls being products of inbreeding, calling them trash, and suggesting beating the attackers are among the responses. There is one interesting, thoughtful response from someone who says she went to school with these girls. She comments on trying to put the blame on myspace or youtube. She gives me some hope.
    -Sarah

    Comment by sostrom — April 9, 2008 @ 8:23 am

  6. I cannot even imagine this type of brutality being inflicted on a teenage girl over catty comments made on a website. The fact that she was beaten until she passed out and then awoke to another series of beatings is truly upsetting. I saw the video on the news yesterday and was appalled by the fact that these girls continued to scream, punch, and block the door despite this victim’s ovbious lack of agression. When I had learned that the motive behind this was because of comments made on Myspace that made it even worse! Of course we know, especially after reading this week’s novels, that any negative attention can be detrimental to the fragile state of teenagedom, but a retaliation this serious requires dire consuequences. I hope they punish these girls to the fullest extent of the law to punish them for their crime against this girl. Does anyone know the details of these alleged myspace comments? Just curious to see what was so detrimental that it required physical violence and disregard for the law.

    ~Kari

    Comment by kariredmond — April 9, 2008 @ 11:07 pm

  7. The saga continues. Dr. Phil (or a producer of his show) apparently bailed out the ringleader of this attack. This news clip http://video.msn.com/video.aspx?mkt=en-us&vid=827534fe-5778-42e6-a52d-3fa14047d8e1&fg=rss&from=im_f_25-34 shows that teens are speaking out against this attack – and using youtube to do it.

    Many of the reports advocate for increasing restriction on youtube and myspace use. Do you think this is really the solution? Is youtube the problem? I know we’ve asked this before, but where are the PARENTS?

    -Sarah

    Comment by Sarah — April 14, 2008 @ 10:57 am


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