Young Adult Lit/Crit

February 12, 2008

SOLD, ongoing discussion

Filed under: Look What I'm Reading for Book Club! — Joyce @ 12:31 pm

 can finally join this discussion on SOLD.This week I read SOLD for book club and I have several things to add to this discussion. First, I am interested in the way that Lakshmi’s village in Nepal is sexist, vocally sexist, and that the children are even aware of the sexual division. The passage on page 8 about the difference between sons and daughters is a prime example of this idea. For those of you who have read the book, you know what I’m talking about. This idea of being “good as long as she gives you milk and butter” seems to be reflected in the practices of Happiness House, Milk being a stand-in for fertility and perhaps youth, and Butter being the general category of working labor. “Not worth crying over when it’s time to make stew” kind of sums up the rejection of women once they can’t provide sex and labor, a thought that makes me shudder. This would be a good start for discussions on sexism and ageism in the classroom.

Additionally, there is a repetition of the “Everything I need to know” passage. In this repetition, the reader is able to discern how non-traditional learning is passed on from experienced women to less-experienced women. In what ways, I wonder, is this style of learning passing on cultural learning, social learning, employment learning, survival learning…

Thank you for inspiring me to read this novel. I will definately pass it on.

Joyce

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