Young Adult Lit/Crit

February 9, 2008

Filed under: comic/graphic texts — Mandy @ 12:47 pm

Keith’s visit last week was incredibly inspiring and it was a relief to see a teacher who thinks and teaches outside the box, so to speak. Not only was he a wonderful speaker, but I was thoroughly engaged in his discussion of graphic novels. I was so impressed with the writing samples from his students, and it is evident that doing “real” work reaps “real” results, as seem with the novels that are being published and sold, and with the production of the t-shirts. I was also surprised that he teaches phonetics and semantics in his graphic novel class, proving that the work can be meaningful and fun at the same time. Everything about this class seems so legitimate and fun, and Keith is so enthusiastic that I think he is the epitome of how a teacher’s reading life can have a tremendous impact on their teaching life. I look forward to reading the graphic novels on my list, including Maus, Hugo Cabaret, Blankets, Pride of Baghdad, and Electra.


-Mandy

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1 Comment »

  1. Mandy,
    Thanks for kicking off the discussion of Keith’s visit! I also loved having him come visit!
    As you said, I, too, was completely convinced of the legitimacy of his class. The inclusion of semantics is something that I didn’t learn until college, and his course has the feel of a college-level class.
    I also want to address your statement “I was so impressed with the writing samples from his students, and it is evident that doing “real” work reaps “real” results, as seem with the novels that are being published and sold, and with the production of the t-shirts. ” What a great example of authentic learning. These types of projects are the ones I remember most from high school- ones that leave you with work you can be proud of, with a tangible reward and accomplishment.
    As a teacher, Keith seems like a great one. He clearly cares about awakening passion in his students. Who else would let them handle first edition, valuable texts? I can also tell that he can easily help students find graphic novels that will interest them. When I said I might not enjoy reading the superhero comics, he rattled off some titles and authors of graphic novels that I should look up. It was impressive. I believe that if you can make appropriate recommendations to students, they will learn to trust you in many contexts.
    Mandy, my list of graphic novels to read is also growing: Ghost World, Pride of Bagdad, Hugo…

    Allison

    Comment by allison — February 11, 2008 @ 8:36 am


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